Mooney Loons around the world

Stargazing @ Mulanje Mountains, Malawi, Africa

I am by far no planetary expert, but I have always been amazed by what’s ‘out there’.

Southern Cross @ Madagascar, Africa

The imaginary thought of galaxies far, far away, the depth of space, the mystery of other planets. Does princess Leah really exist?

Alien likes @ Madagascar, Africa

Do aliens orbit throughout our galaxy?

Tsirebe River @ Madagascar, Africa

Who hasn’t wondered about the universe above?

Full moon set @ Cape Hillsborough, Tropical Queensland, Australia

The moon is a highly influential planet for our globe. A full moon has magic powers some say. Others believe in secretive rituals.

Feathered beasts @ Crowdy Head, Mid-Northcoast New South Wales, Australia

It turns humans into wolven beasts. Some just can’t sleep throughout the lunar cycle. I will leave the science to the planextperts. 

Magical appearance @ Terrigal, Central Coast New South Wales, Australia

But there is something magical about the full moon. The moon’s gravity towards the earth changes ocean waters all around the world.

Open waters @ Terrigal, Central Coast, New South Wales, Australia

What better place to photograph the full moon when it’s rising over the ocean.

Full moon set @ Madagascar’s West Coast, Africa

The vastness over the ocean extended to the moon is just mesmerising. A bright pathway leads straight to the man in the moon.

Rolling rocks @ Terrigal, Central Coast New South Wales, Australia

Rolling waves over past rolling rocks. Using a slow shutter-speed scenario, one automatically integrated the ocean’s movements within the frame.

Curtain waters @ Terrigal, Central Coast New South Wales, Australia

A glary curtain of waves. Full moonlight is 400000 times fainter than the sun. This results in a photographic problem. The camera needs more time to gather enough light for a clear capture.

Slow Shutter speed @ Terrigal, Central Coast New South Wales, Australia

The decrease of the shutter speed then also picks up movements within the time frame.

Moving waters @ Terrigal, Central Coast New South Wales, Australia

These turn into individual strings during the slow shutter period. Water movements change to a very different picture.

Lighthouse factor @ Fingal Headland, Northern New South Wales, Australia

It pays to do a bit of research before setting off for a full moon photo frenzy.

Another perfect location @ Terrigal, Central Coast New South Wales, Australia

Preferably a few days before a full moon.

Palm tree lining @ Hinchinbrook Island, Tropical Queensland, Australia

This helps you to see in which angle the moon appears over the horizon. Then you can line up any other object with the rising moon.

Homework executed @ Hinchinbrook Island, Tropical Queensland, Australia

If you’re in unknown territory, it always pays to listen to local advice. Study local maps to mark out prominent locations. Any kind of waterways reflects some moonlight.

Double impact @ Terrigal, Central Coast New South Wales, Australia

Reflections of the water is a modest way to double the light impact. Not only over the vast ocean. Flat, wet surfaces reflect any light perfectly.

Frame change within seconds @ Terrigal, Central Coast New South Wales, Australia

If this surface gets frequently overflown by ocean ripples, it changes the whole concept of the photo.

Cascading waters @ Terrigal, Central Coast New South Wales, Australia

A little rock pool, that momentarily catches the sea waters, creates small cascades. 

Calm waters @ Moonee Beach, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Calm lakes reflect moonlight flawlessly.

Tidal pool reflections @ Cape Hillsborough, Tropical Queensland, Australia

Still tidal puddles along the foreshore will differ reflections depending on their size.

Moon lid waves @ Diggers beach, Coffs Harbour, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Headlands are always a considerable location, due to their 180 degrees view. These often differ vastly from another.

Moonrise @ Fingal Headland, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Some headlands are covered in flora, while others don’t. They both have a different magical effect.

Lighthouse @ Fingal Headland, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Some marine strategically important headlands transmit lighthouses for over a hundred years or more.

Light beams @ Fingal Headland, Northern New South Wales, Australia

How is this for a picture? All four light beams are captured within this frame. And the moon adds to a fabulous landscape.

Cloud busting @ Terrigal, Central Coast New South Wales, Australia

It isn’t only the moon itself that makes one photo better than the other. Fluffy clouds fill in over the horizon extremely well. Changing light and ray appearance behind or around the clouds. 

Monthly full moon @ Fingal Headland, Northern New South Wales, Australia

The full moon always rises at sunset. Every 28 days.


Last sun rays @ Terrigal, Central Coast New South Wales, Australia

With a little luck and a favourable location, sunset and moonrise can be experienced at the same time. What a spectacle.

Golden hour @ Hinchinbrook Island, Tropical Queensland, Australia

This is the photographically called ‘golden hour’. You may not look towards the sun directly, but fading sun rays are lighting surroundings nicely. Adding additional light and complexion to the frame.

Palm tree moonrise @ Hinchinbrook Island, Tropical Queensland, Australia

While the moon rises to the east.

Sunny appearance @ Fingal Headland, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Other times, the full moon appears to shimmer as bright as the sun.

Moonrise @ Fingal Headland, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Only the stars above prove nighttime hours. 

Full moon in sepia @ Hinchinbrook Island, Tropical Queensland, Australia

I personally like to use the sepia setting for full moon photos too.

Pelican @ Crowdy Head, Mid-Northcoast New South Wales, Australia

And if one is really lucky, the full moon appears behind old friends. This pelican had the best of both planets.

Scratching @ Crowdy Head, Mid-Northcoast New South Wales, Australia

One needed a scratch to believe it. The pelican’s orange glow really is enchanting.   

Full moon camp @ Drakenberg Mountains, South Africa, Africa

Once the moon has risen high enough, it’s moonlight intensity increases. One can see objects quite clearly within fullmoonlight.

Full moon lid gumtrees @ Moonee Beach, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Just like the sun, the moon shines directly on to objects like trees. Solely with an extra dash of red.

Memorable Breakdown @ Khaudum National Park, Namibia, Africa

I was particularly thankful for moonlight at my memorable breakdown in the Kalahari Desert two years ago.

Full moon antics @ Khaudum National Park, Namibia, Africa

It enabled me to watch this pride of lions without a torch.

Forestry @ Park Beach, Coffs Harbour, Northern New South Wales, Australia

One has also the choice to aim towards the moon, like in a forest. The options are endless, once you know what you are looking for.

Moony Loons @ Diggers Headland, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Don’t forget to invite a friend for some moony loons. 

One thought on “Mooney Loons around the world

  1. Wow these photos are magical, stunning colours captured in the full moons light so beautiful,,,l loved gazing through this story, feelings of excitement and wonder at our fabulous moon and stars,, awesome photography jus breathtaking xxx

    Like

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