Bird Voodoo under the rising Blood Moon, Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

On the lookout @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

I haven’t come across many places where birdlife is prolific in both, diversity and quantity.

Welcome to @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Evans Head surely is one of these habitats.

Double lookout @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

I have written a few stories about this coastal community and it just keeps getting better.

A star gala @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Pelicans returned from their nesting spots inland and guided their offspring home.

Pelican school @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Now at pelican school, the youngsters line up for their final exams.

Coming up! @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

They haven’t lost their wit to entertain.

Pelican reflections @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

And those reflections.

Playful lorikeets @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Screeching lorikeets move from tree to tree in search of a delicacy.

Early morning sunshine @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

There is always something going on.

Nest guardians @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Twittering galahs amuse just as well.

Fire pole @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

The fire alarm went off on this pole. I haven’t seen any corellas and only a few black cockatoos this time around.

Ravaging raptors @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

But my focus this time was about soaring raptors.

Pole position @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

It’s not hard to miss this neighbouring osprey family high above. They are excellent fish hunters. Almost every time the adult returned to the nest, a fish was flapping in its claws.

Tasty mullet @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Mullets are surface feeding fish and a preferred target. I have taken photos of this pair before, but nothing like this.

Closeup @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

My new super-zoom lens brings me closer than ever. Dark blue skies add remarkably well.

What you looking at? @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Facial expressions are much easier to analyze as well. This osprey is hungry, bone appetite.

Neck roll @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

When ospreys are curious about something, they bend their neck and shake their head from left to right. Like an owl.

Is that me? @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

It’s a curious display for both of us. This osprey may have seen his reflection in my lens.

What’s that? @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

They have tremendous eyesight.

Cutting Edge @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

They are incredibly messy eaters too. A razor-sharp beak is almost too sharp to slice through soft meat.

Scaling heights @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Standing directly underneath a feeding osprey almost certainly results in a shower of scales. Seagulls and ibis happily pick up smudges tumbling from above.

Clean up @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

The beak gets a clean after each meal.

After breakfast stretch @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

And a full belly scratch doesn’t go astray either. One morning, this adult couldn’t listen to his grown offspring anymore and changed location. This pole was only half as tall and gave me an even closer insight.

Wing check @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

I waited 20 minutes for him to fly off.

Off he goes @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

I am glad I did.

Bridge to civilisation @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

On the western side of this bridge, suburbia extended into Bundjalung National Park.

Last frontier @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Mangroves turned this tidal estuary into a vital natural habitat. Young and small wildlife find food and shelter within mangrove roots. This follows the food chain all the way to the top.

Where eagles soar @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

They keep a watchful eye out at high altitude. I wasn’t surprised to see up to 7 birds of prey soaring the sky. Intrigued, a paddle excursion unfolded on my inflatable kayak. Once unpacked, I added a few extras. Two fishing rods with different lures. I even caught a couple of flathead. These fish camouflage on the river bottom and ambush bypassing fish or crustaceans. And I took my camera with me off course. Nature gazing and photography whilst kayaking and fishing. I am in ‘Evan’. Four of my favourite activities combined in one. Wind and weather were on my side just as well.

First things first @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

The first object of interest was a low-tide sandbar, which had a keen interest already. All eyes were on me.

A small step for pelican @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

I came in peace, but some birds didn’t agree with my intruding behaviour and flew off.

Sand bank @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

That’s what I sand-banked on. With the sun right behind me, splendid colours unraveled.

Cleaning station @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Some pelicans couldn’t care less by my doing. Sandy colours add perfectly to this environment.

Wedge-tail eagle @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

I left these tired fishermen to their siesta, as I spotted a few eagles in the sky just above the tree line. One landed on a eucalyptus tree on the riverbank. And there he was.

Incredible to observe @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Australia’s biggest raptor sat right in front of me. Wedgetail eagles have almost been hunted to extinction due to their size and an infamous reputation of killing lambs. Mankind at its worst, intimidated by the size. Now that the lambs are silent, wedgies are protected and vital help to farmers. In some parts of the country, 90 per cent of an eagle’s diet was introduced by European settlers and multiplied to plague proportions.

Calm customer @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

This particular bird was as calm as it could be, sitting on one claw only. Maybe he didn’t see my yellow rubber duck? Needle sharp daggers keep a firm grip on anything. His wingspan would be close to 2.5 meters.

Amazing @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

One of the world’s largest flying bird stares right at me from a short distance. I pushed maniyak of the mud, facing him whilst drifting off with the current. Prachtvoll.

Further upstream @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

This stretch of the river seemed particularly good hunting ground. A lengthy island divides the Evans River and exposes sand flats at low tide on both sides. The main current carved a deep channel along the southern riverbank, flanked with tall eucalyptus trees.

Sea eagle pair @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

A perfect scenario all along. A pair of sea eagles sat almost motionless. Their plumage gave them away. How about this for a proud pair.

Better angle @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

I waded through the mangrove mud to get a better angle on a stable platform.

Not much going on there @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Both are important factors for photography, even more so with this zoom-zoom.

Left in peace @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Just as important for me is not to stress my models. A storm was brewing over the horizon and it was time to float downstream.

Pelican trail @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

By mid-afternoon, all pelicans had left Gilligan Island.

Fishy take-away @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

They made their way to McFishy Take-away.

Quick, we’re missing out @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

The early bird special had started.

Quick, pelicans are coming @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Seagulls had first pickings.

Fly away buffet @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

All you can eat buffet.

Hard fish to swallow @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

If you could swallow it.

Strength in numbers @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Others had a surprisingly relaxed approach. Fishermen returned from their outing and kept everyone busy around the filleting table.

Bizarre reflections@ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Reflecting signs create a bizarre image of colour and patterns.

What about me? @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

A very hungry cormorant decided to mix with the big guns.

Snatch and dispatch @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

He had a cunning plan.

Pelicans in pursuit @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

Grab a piece of fish and make a dive for it.

Dinner’s served @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

He needs to surface to swallow this big piece of fish.

Over the moon @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

What an action-packed day today was under the rising moon.

Upstream gang @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

I am thrilled.

Moonlighting @ Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

I wonder what happens beyond Evan Head’s bridge tomorrow.

One thought on “Bird Voodoo under the rising Blood Moon, Evans Head, Northern New South Wales, Australia

  1. Nice pictures l likeaa the birds on the pole very cool and the most beautiful colours and reflections of the solo pelican ‘Bizarre reflections’ great close-ups of the eagles and osprey too ,,

    Like

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