The Sahara Desert; part seven, Signs of Life and Death, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

The Sahara truly is a magnificent place.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Desert mountains @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

Everything you’ve seen or heard about this land of sand is true.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Stunning @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

Sandy waves as far as the eye can see in either direction and deception. 

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Wall of sand @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

A birds-eye view gives a better understanding, of how these towering dunes are created by shifting sands. V

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Moon craters @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

Valleys appear like moon craters in a landscape the size of Europe.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Lost @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

This vastness is the desert’s oversized misconception, it is easy to loose orientation. If you do, good luck to you.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Source of life @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

Running out of water here is both, lethal and paradoxical. The Sahara Desert holds the largest underground freshwater reservoir in the world in sandstone caves buried in hundreds of meters of sand and stone.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Man-made oasis @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

Oasis are the few places, where the water reaches the ground surface.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Footprints @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

‘Reading’ the sand properly is a vital exercise that will make the difference between pleasure and pain, or even death.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Insect trail @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

Horned vipers, so-called Sidewinders, leave an S-shaped trail over the dunes as they travel. This looks as amazing as efficient on film. Do not follow these tracks, unless you feel a bit ‘Crikey’. Although buried in the sand to attract reptiles, the chances of being bitten by a viper are slim. But ‘a’ chance remains. Scorpions prefer to hide under stones during the midday heat, who could blame them? On wintery cold nights, scorpions are attracted by the heat from Open Fires. Sit up high around the fire and keep an eye out for those venomous critters. Check your shoes, if you are wearing any, and always close your tent zipper completely. 

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Silver ants @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

Silver ants wear a protective and reflective silver suit. This allows them to tackle the heat a little longer than other insects, which get baked on the sand.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Stick insect @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

It’s sticky business.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Chilly morning @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

In no other ecosystem at sea level is the temperature difference during winter months as obvious as it is in the desert. 30+ degrees Celsius during the day can quickly drop below freezing point overnight.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Hot sand @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

It is the temperature that indicates sand and driving conditions. The burning sun warms up the air particles within the sand, which then expands. 

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Hot and soft @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

The hotter the sand, the more the air expands and therefore the softer the sand appears. It is ALWAYS easiest to drive on soft sand early morning.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Hovering @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

In extreme heat, these sand particles hover over the ground and a little bit of wind can create the deadliest threat of all.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Grains @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

Sandstorms can extend over several 100 km in width and bury anything in their path. These sand grains enter the atmosphere and fertilize areas like the Amazon Basin, 1000,’s and one kilometer away. How amazing is this planet?

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Wind blown @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

The wind is also a significant factor in your off-road driving experience.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
East to west @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

For example, an easterly wind carries the sand from the eastern side over the top to the western side.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Bizarre @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

What that means, is that the eastern side will be easier to traverse, as the sand is sturdier on this front.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Natural beauty @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

All these aspects are solely common sense, which is what you need to survive out here. Or anywhere.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Date farm @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

Geographically and unfortunately, Tunisia’s desert doesn’t hold oilfields as the neighboring countries do.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Douz neighbourhood @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

Tunisia is a very poor country and relies heavily on the tourism industry.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Off-roaders @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

The northern rim of the Sahara Desert is very popular with off-road enthusiasts from Europe.

Genoa to Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
I Q @Genoa to Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

Overcrowded ferries from France and Italy yield easy access to Northern Africa, which clearly takes the fun out of my adventure.

Rome, Italy, Europe
Stop and no go @Rome, Italy, Europe

It took THREE hours to actually leave the ferry on our return to Rome. Cars on two parking levels were combatting inch for inch to get to the ramp. Drivers arguing and squabbling with each other.

Rome, Italy, Europe
Unbelievable @Rome, Italy, Europe

Air pollution from hundreds of running cars in poorly ventilated chambers. Inhumane behavior at its worst, is simply disgusting.

New South Wales, Australia
Woody Head @New South Wales, Australia

Sure, not everyone is lucky enough to live in Australia,

New South Wales, Australia
Bellingen @New South Wales, Australia

where I can choose my ecosystem domain of choice for the day, or a week or so.

New South Wales, Australia
Crowdy Head @New South Wales, Australia

But that is the reason why I live there.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Beat up @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

However, it is the Sahara Desert that takes the beating. Despite its size, it is still a fragile ecosystem.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Habitat @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

Animals big and small depend on the few trees that sparsely remain here and there.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Shelter and Shade @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

They offer shelter, shade and food for desert dwellers. These scrubs are part of this gigantic ecosystem.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Left for dead @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

Instead, whole trees are burnt to the ground. For what? Because we can?

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Just rubbish @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

The biggest killer of the Sahara Desert, or any place on this planet, is rubbish. I couldn’t believe how many plastic bags and bottles lined the Sahara tracks. Cigarette butts are simply flicked out of the hands of careless smokers. It is the combination of arrogance and ignorance of us humans that really pisses me off. WE are too fudging lazy to discard our rubbish properly, when we should only leave footprints and impressions behind.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Wine and dine @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

WE went through so much more trouble to buy and collect those items, why is it so hard to put them into a rubbish bag? Are they really that big and heavy, that we can’t collect them and discard them properly? I am embarrassed to be a human. Here I am feeling guilty about leaving toilet paper buried in the sand, whilst glass bottles are smashed and left behind with broken camping chairs.

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Mirror @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

Yet, everyone blames someone else and not the man in the mirror. It’s just not good enough. How is Mother Nature ever going to survive, if our growing population teaches juniors not to respect nature’s law? What answers will you have, when they ask you in some years’ time about the state of our planet?

Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa
Dire Straits @Sahara Desert, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

My hope and faith for the survival of this planet, the only one with coffee and chocolate, is fading day by day. There’s no planet B, it’s as simple as that. 

One thought on “The Sahara Desert; part seven, Signs of Life and Death, Douz, Tunisia, Africa

  1. Thank you for these beautiful pictures and your so truly comments.
    Good look for further travels and maybe we meet again somewhere.
    Cornelia and Jean-François Christinet
    (we met in Lusaka Pioneer Camp and in Lower Zambezi National Park and just before you entered the park and we left the park and you took pictures of the killing of a buffalo by 3 or 4 lions)

    Like

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