Nkasa Rupara National Park, Namibia

Camping along the Rupara River, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

Camping along the Rupara River, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

Arriving at the community campground just north off the entrance to the National Park, the setting was perfect for another wildlife spectacular.

Many trees have their own defence system st Nkasa National Park, Namibia

Many trees have their own defense system st Nkasa National Park, Namibia

The campsites are dotted along the Rupara River, a tranquil and scenic setting. Nkasa Rupara National Park lies opposite Botswana’s Linyanti swamps, which was teaming with wildlife. Hopefully, it will be the same here. It was hot and I picked a shady spot under a large tree. Lighting the bush tv, I shone my torch through the water channel and high grass. Maybe some wildlife would show itself, but that didn’t happen. The frogs were happily croaking. 

Early morning glory, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

Early morning glory, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

Early morning start again, I was anxious to get out.

Tranquil morning at Nkasa National Park, Namibia

A tranquil morning at Nkasa National Park, Namibia

A stunning start to the day.

Empty gate, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

Empty gate, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

Arriving at the gate, no park warden was to be found.

Perfect wildlife settings, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

Perfect wildlife settings, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

Higher elevated tree-lined islands around high grass, which becomes a swamp in the rainy season. Pumba and many other of his families were abundant, the odd small Impala heard showed as well. But that was it. I crossed a few knee deep channels surrounded by lush green grass out west.

He was sitting there for a while, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

He was sitting there for a while, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

A lone kingfisher was on the lookout. Apart from that, Nada. I was a bit perplexed, as this is the perfect terrain for grazers and hunters. A dead buffalo laid on the side off the track, still fully visible in fur coat and shape. He either died off old age, or my guess, the deadly ‘foot and mouth’ disease. No jackals, no lions, not even vultures were feasting. 

This is all very strange. I turned around east and hoped that there would be more wildlife sightings on Rupara Island. Cut off and surrounded by flood waters in summer, surrounded by channels, waterholes, and swamps. A different scenery in the dry season, I was hoping for an abundance of animals. I drove all the way down to ‘Mamil’ Camp, close to the Park boundary along the Rupara River with exactly the same result.

Scary quiet, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

Scary quiet, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

The waterways were deserted, no hippo to be seen or heard. Not even birds were around. 

Oh look! There is a zebra!, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

Oh look! There is a zebra!, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

Zimba was the only zebra near and far. Yes, I know, I know. Herds move around and one has to be at the right spot at the right time. But to me, it appears that most animals sought shelter over Botswana’s boundary. Poaching still is a major issue in Namibia. Wealthy Mzungu can obtain expensive hunting licenses to shoot prized animals, whilst traditional food hunting for the native tribes are forbidden.


A small herd off elephants, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

A small herd of elephants, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

I came across a small herd of elephants on my way back to camp.

Quick in to the bushes, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

Quick into the bushes, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

These disappeared rather quickly in thick bush. It was hot already when I got back to Camp before lunchtime. At least I could sit under a shady tree by a very quiet river.

Southern Yellow Hornbill, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

Southern Yellow Hornbill, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

A pair off Southern Yellow Hornbills joined me on my relaxed afternoon.

Pretty in black and white, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

Pretty in black and white, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

They sat in a nearby tree and had a good look around.

Cleaning the feather costume, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

Cleaning the feather costume, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

As no danger was to be seen,

The left side too, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

The left side too, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

cleaning their feathers is part of any birds routine.

Some food on the ground?, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

Some food on the ground?, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

Maybe some food may be lying on the ground?

Pretty Hornbill, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

Pretty Hornbill, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

They are quite entertaining to watch. They do hop, but can also run along.

Hoping around, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

Hoping around, Nkasa National Park, Namibia

There wasn’t much else Wildlife to spot. A tranquil night by the fire was interrupted by a young gang of 6 Germans. Mistaking they were in a pub, screaming and shouting along. They got the message after I paid a visit. It’s time to move on again for many reasons. 

Lifeless scenes, Mudumu National Park, Namibia

Lifeless scenes, Mudumu National Park, Namibia

I had a cruisy day in mind. I stopped at ‘Mudumbu National Park’ early morning which looked promising on the map. Right along at the Okavango River, surely there would be some wildlife to be seen.

Empty spaces, Mudumu National Park, Namibia

Empty spaces, Mudumu National Park, Namibia

I came to a lookout Hyde along the river, which boosted absolutely no wildlife. Not even hippos were seen or heard. This is rather disappointing.

Was there a splash? , Mudumu National Park, Namibia

Was there a splash? Kingfisher at Mudumu National Park, Namibia

A lone kingfisher sat up high in the tree on the lookout for some fish.

Of he goes, Mudumu National Park, Namibia

Of he goes, Mudumu National Park, Namibia

And he was off.

On the lookout again, Mudumu National Park, Namibia

On the lookout again, Mudumu National Park, Namibia

He did return empty handed a few times.

Stalking Water lilies, Mudumu National Park, Namibia

Stalking Water lilies, Mudumu National Park, Namibia

A wading bird stalking the water lilies leaf canopy seemed to be attracted to the water lilies itself.

Water Lilly Forrest, Mudumu National Park, Namibia

Water Lilly Forrest, Mudumu National Park, Namibia

A colourful display. But all in all, it was time to leave the Caprivi Strip with its lifeless waterways and head for the Kalahari Desert. My hopes are not high for a Wildlife bonanza. Let’s see what happens.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s